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The Global Training & Development Institute facilitates international student mobility through the coordination of non-degree programs for international students from select participating institutions around the world.

Students interested in participating must be nominated by their home institution. Participating institutions are listed under International Student Mobility Initiatives. In addition to fulfilling the general university-wide requirements, international non-degree students must fulfill department/program specific requirements. The final admissions decision rests with the hosting UConn department (in the case of undergraduate non-degree study) or with the UConn Graduate School (in the case of graduate study). Individual department requirements can be found below. These requirements may include minimum GPA, skype interviews, specific course prerequisites, etc.

International students seeking non-degree admission under the Statistics 3+1 program must demonstrate a strong background in quantitative training and have a GPA of 3.4 or higher in core Mathematics/Statistics courses (2- or 3- semester Calculus sequence including multivariate calculus; Linear Algebra; and 2-semester Probability and Statistics sequence).Preference will be given to students who have completed 1-2 semester real analysis and/or at least two applied statistics courses (e.g., regression, multivariate analysis, experimental design, computing, etc.), and who are familiar with statistical software (e.g., SAS/R) or other programming languages (C/C++/Fortran). Verbal and written proficiency in English is critical for success in this program.

Admitted students will meet with an advisor in the department of Statistics to discuss his/her plan of study while at UConn:

4th Year Undergraduate (UConn): Students can choose from three suggested tracks that differ in the core sequence.

  • Track I: Graduate level Mathematical Statistics sequence.
  • Track II: Graduate level Applied Statistics sequence.
  • Track III: Undergraduate level Mathematical Statistics sequence.

Elective courses can be chosen from Analysis of Experiments, Design of Experiments, Biostatistics, Applied Time Series, Stochastic Processes, Statistical Computing, Nonparametric Methods, Undergraduate Research, or other related courses with advisor approval.

Prior to admission as a Horticulture Major under the Plant Science & Landscape Architecture 3+1+X program, all international non-degree students must complete coursework in inorganic or general chemistry, introductory botany or biology and soils. Students are encouraged to complete course work in organic chemistry and statistics. All applicants are required to participate in a Skype interview as part of the evaluation process.Admitted students will meet with an advisor in the department of Plant Sciences & Landscape Architecture to discuss his/her plan of study while at UConn:

4th Year Undergraduate (UConn): A minimum of 12 credits are required for full time student status by the U.S. immigration laws. Horticulture students can choose to concentrate in either a) Sustainable Agriculture or b) Environmental and Landscape Horticulture.

The following is a list of courses students may choose from to fulfill their requirements:

HORT 2430 Herbaceous Plant Materials (3 credits)
HORT 2750 Landscape Plant Maintenance (3 credits)
HORT 3410 Woody Plants I: Common Trees, Shrubs and Vines (3 credits)
HORT 3540 Garden Center Management (3 credits)
HORT 2520 Floral Art (2 credits)
HORT 3530 Advanced Floral Design (2 credits)
HORT 3620 Vegetable Production (4 credits)
HORT 3640 Plant Propagation (3 credits)
HORT 3660 Nursery Production (3 credits)
HORT 3670 Greenhouse Technology and Operations (4 credits)
HORT 3765 Phytotechnology: Use of Plants for Ecosystem Services (3 credits)

PLSC 3995 Transgenic Crops from Farm to Fork (2credits)
PLSC 3094 Farm Production Systems in the US (1 credit)
PLSC 3090 Farm Production Systems in the US (2 credit travel course)
PLSC 3995 Agroecology: Agriculture in Harmony with the Environment (3 credit)
PLSC 3995 Environmental Sustainability of Food Production in North America (2 credit)
PLSC 1125 Insects, Food and Culture (3 credits)
PLSC 1150 Agricultural Technology and Society (3 credits)
PLSC 3210 Molecular Laboratory Technology (3 credits)
PLSC 3230 Biotechnology – Science, Application, Impact, Perception (3 credits)
PLSC 3240 Plant Biotechnology (3 credits)
PLSC 3250 Plant Gene Transfer Techniques (3 credits)
PLSC 3810 Plant Diseases (3 credits)
PLSC 3820 Weed Ecology & Control (3 credits)
PLSC 3830 Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Turf (3 credits)
PLSC 3840 Integrated Pest Management (3 credits)

SOIL 3220 Soil Formation and Classification (3 credits)
SOIL 3410 Soil Chemistry Components (4 credits)
SOIL 3620 Soil Fertility (3 credits)

ARE 3215 Business Management (3 credits)

Prior to admission as a Turf grass or Soil Science Major under the Plant Science & Landscape Architecture 3+1+1 program, all international non-degree students must complete coursework in inorganic or general chemistry, introductory botany or biology and soils. Students are encouraged to complete course work in organic chemistry and statistics. All applicants are required to participate in a Skype interview as part of the evaluation process.Admitted students will meet with an advisor in the department of Plant Sciences & Landscape Architecture to discuss his/her plan of study while at UConn:

4th Year Undergraduate (UConn): A minimum of 12 credits are required for full time student status by the U.S. immigration laws. Turf & Soil Science students can choose to concentrate in either a) Turfgrass Management or b) Soil Science.

The following is a list of courses students may choose from to fulfill their requirements:

TURF 2200 Athletic Field Management (3 Credits)
TURF 3100 Golf Course Management (3 Credits)
TURF 3200 Turfgrass Physiology and Ecology (3 Credits)
TURF 3300 Principles of Turfgrass Irrigation Systems (3 Credits)
TURF 3400 Professional Development for Turfgrass Industries (2 Credits)
TURF 3720 Golf Course Design (2 Credits)
TURF 3800 Turfgrass Pests and Control (3 Credits)

HORT 2750 Landscape Plant Maintenance (3 credits)
HORT 3410 Woody Plants I: Common Trees, Shrubs and Vines (3 credits)
HORT 3640 Plant Propagation (3 credits)
HORT 3765 Phytotechnology: Use of Plants for Ecosystem Services (3 credits)

PLSC 1150 Agricultural Technology and Society (3 credits)
PLSC 3230 Biotechnology – Science, Application, Impact, Perception (3 credits)
PLSC 3810 Plant Diseases (3 credits)
PLSC 3820 Weed Ecology & Control (3 credits)
PLSC 3830 Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Turf (3 credits)
PLSC 3840 Integrated Pest Management (3 credits)

SOIL 3220 Soil Formation and Classification (3 credits)
SOIL 3410 Soil Chemistry Components (4 credits)
SOIL 3620 Soil Fertility (3 credits)

ARE 3215 Business Management (3 credits)
NRE 3245 Environmental Law (3 credits)

PLSC 3995 Transgenic Crops from Farm to Fork (2credits)
PLSC 3094 Farm Production Systems in the US (1 credit)
PLSC 3090 Farm Production Systems in the US (2 credits travel course)
PLSC 3995 Agroecology: Agriculture in Harmony with the Environment (3 credits)
PLSC 3995 Environmental Sustainability of Food Production in North America (2 credits)

Prior to admission as a Landscape Architecture Major under the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture 3+1+1, all international non-degree students must complete coursework in graphic communications, construction, history/theory and design. Students are strongly encouraged to complete course work in the following computer programs: Adobe Photoshop, AutoCAD, GIS and Sketch-Up. All applicants are required to participate in a Skype interview as part of the evaluation process. In addition, students applying to the Landscape Architecture program must submit a Graphic Portfolio of their work prior to the Skype interview Portfolio Guidelines:

Please label all work as academic, professional or personal.
For the academic work, explicitly describe if it is a design, graphic and/or construction assignment.
If team projects are presented, your individual contribution must be clearly identified.
The portfolio should include a minimal amount of text.
Admitted students will meet with an advisor in the department of Plant Sciences and Landscape Architecture to discuss his/her plan of study while at UConn.

4th Year Undergraduate (UConn): A minimum of 12 credits (4 courses) are required for full time student status by the U.S. immigration laws. The curriculum at UConn’s Program of Landscape Architecture consists of four interrelated sequences of courses with the design sequence at the core. The sequences are designed to proceed from basic knowledge and skill acquisition to advanced form-giving/design development. a) students with advanced skills will join an existing cohort of UConn students entering their fourth and final year of undergraduate study; b) students with intermediate skills will take lower level intermediate design courses.

Please reference section below for Perquisite knowledge/skills. Curriculum during this year is as follows:

Fall Semester:
LAND 4440 (5 credits) Community Design and Planning or intermediate level LA Design II
LAND 4294 (3 credits) Seminar – Sustainable Topics in Landscape Architecture
LAND 3130 (4 credits) Landscape Architecture Graphics III
Elective (3 credits) Optional if desired by student

Spring Semester:
LAND 4440 (5 credits) Advanced Design or (or intermediate level LA Design III)
LAND 4330 (4 credits) Planting Design
LAND 3230 (3 credits) Writings in Landscape Architecture
Elective (3 credits) Optional if desired by student

1st Year Graduate: 3+1+1 students must apply (during their 4th undergraduate year) and be accepted into a graduate program. 1+1 Students must apply through the Graduate School.

Curriculum during this year is as follows:

Fall Semester:
PLSC 5460 Sustainable Site Design (5 credits)
PLSC 5250 Transdisciplinary & Participatory Design (3 credits)
PLSC 5899 Independent Study under the direction of a faculty advisor
 (1-6 credits)
Elective Optional (3 credits)

Spring Semester:
PLSC 5470 Sustainable Coastal Land Use Planning (5 credits)
PLSC 5260 Global perspectives in Landscape Architecture (3 credits)
PLSC 5899 Independent Study under the direction of a faculty advisor
 (1-6 credits)
Elective Optional (3 credits)

Perquisite knowledge/skills needed

  • Graphic Communication Sequence: Encompasses knowledge/skills necessary to communicate design ideas with generally accepted graphic techniques used in the profession, such as free-hand sketching/diagramming, measured and scaled, sections, plans, and perspectives and computer applications.
  • Free-hand drawing: Knowledge and theory of graphic representation, exploration and development of form. Introduction to basic spatial principles. Application of graphic and design theory through abstraction and transformation of form emphasized.
  • Drawing Conventions: Knowledge and theory of visual perception and model making. Application of theory to the creation of various graphic products including plan, section, elevation, paraline and perspective drawings. Controlled free hand and computer methods in a studio environment.
  • Computer Applications: Knowledge and theory of computer use in landscape architecture. Computer applications for data gathering, analysis and graphic communication. Includes CAD, GIS, 3D Modeling and photo manipulation. Application of knowledge and theory to a variety of site planning and design projects.
  • Construction Sequence: Encompasses knowledge/skills necessary to understand how a conceptual design is transformed into construction documents that will allow for built projects that protects the general health, safety and welfare of the general public.
  • Site Engineering: Theory and practice in manipulating landform in landscape architecture. Earthwork computation, drainage systems, sedimentation and erosion control, bio-retention, roadway design and low-impact design methods.
  • Materials and Methods: Knowledge and theory of site construction. Characteristics and installation methods of materials including concrete, masonry, wood and metal. Application of knowledge and theory through development of construction drawings and related documents for site construction projects.
  • Planting Design: Knowledge and theory of the role of plants as visual, spatial, ecological and cultural design elements. Analysis and creation of planting plans that support and develop design concepts and respond to physical site conditions. Application of knowledge and theory by developing planting plans, models and databases for a variety of project types in a studio environment.
  • History and Theory Sequence: Encompasses knowledge set help students discover their own attitudes, introduce them to examples of superior design, and teach them the basic design principles and analysis techniques that they will apply to their own work.
  • The Common (Shared) Landscape of the USA: Rights, Responsibilities and Values An introduction to the study of vernacular landscapes in the USA with an emphasis on the relationship between societal values and land use patterns.
  • Design History: The development of designed landscapes is followed through time, emphasizing influences on current landscape architecture theory and practice. The course covers large scale planning through garden design.
  • Environmental Planning and Landscape Design Theories, concepts and methods for sustainable design of the land to balance the needs for conservation and development. Topics include land use planning, ecological design, and cultural and natural landscape assessment at a variety of scales and settings.
  • Design/Planning Sequence: Encompasses knowledge/skills necessary to produce design/planning projects which promotes a balance between visionary form-giving capabilities and social needs. Students are expected to be aware of how their design reacts to the existing natural and cultural systems and therefore maintain or creates long term site sustainability.
  • Site Analysis Knowledge and theory of site design and site analysis. Dimensional requirements and appropriate relationships of site elements and systems. Collection and analysis of site data including legal, physical and cultural factors. Application in a variety of site design projects.
  • Space, Form and Meaning Knowledge and theory of spatial form in architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. Application of theory in the creation of 3-dimensional landscape models in a studio environment. Student attitudes about self-expression, environmental issues and social responsibility will be explored.
  • Program Development Knowledge and theory of site design and planning with a focus on program analysis and development. Design of appropriate form and function through precedent study and research on user and client needs, development regulations and site context. Application of theory to a variety of project types and scales.

Note: Students with advanced skills will be placed in Plan of Study Option I. Students with intermediate skills will be placed in Plan of Study Option II.